SIMULATION OVERVIEW

The central part of “What a Day” is an online simulation where the participants spend 25 minutes managing highly realistic situations where they interact intensely (via video-calls) with fictitious colleagues and customers.

Participants must manage three competing challenges in this fictitious scenario (back at the office after a well-deserved holiday). Information about the challenges can be found via e-mails, documents and dialogue with colleagues (via pre-recorded video calls). Participants are forced to make decisions and there is not enough time to thoroughly work through each challenge (sound familiar?). And of course:  Every decision influences how the game progresses.

All decisions, as well as lack of decisions, and every second spent is analyzed and debriefed to the participants in the form of individual feedback on 8 performance indicators in three “leadership dimensions”:

  • TIME & ATTENTION MANAGEMENT
  • OPPORTUNITY & PROBLEM MANAGEMENT 
  • PEOPLE & MOTIVATION MANAGEMENT


The results are combined with debriefing containing strong learning points. The learning focuses on how to better balance priorities in an intense everyday work situation, providing food for thought about how we as individual leaders and as a group spend our time and effort. The debriefing also includes several opportunities to reflect on the feedback and to identify potential improvements.

What a Day top
Picture from the What a Day Introduction movie

1) THE INTRODUCTION

A short video introduces the scenario. The participants face three competing challenges that all demand immediate attention.

WATCH ON YOU TUBE

Picture from the What a Day simulation experience

2) THE SIMULATION EXPERIENCE

The simulation takes place from a desktop, where information about the challenges can be found via e-mails, documents and dialogue (via more than 100 prerecorded video calls).

The decision structure - example of dilemma interface

3) THE DECISION STRUCTURE

During the simulation, different people will call you or be available for contact. They will ask you to make various decisions and these decisions influence how the story develops.

Example of the time spent performance indicator

4) THE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

All behavior is measured and reported in relation to eight performance indicators. This feedback plays an important part in the debriefing.

Debrifing model - example from slide presentation

5) DEBRIEFING AND LEARNING POINTS

The debriefing provides food for thought about how we, as leaders and as a company, balance:
Time & Attention management, Opportunity & Problem management and People & Motivational management.

Example of grid analysis interface

6) TEAM ANALYSIS

When a group has completed the simulation, the team analysis reveals different behavioral patterns. This insight can be used for reflection as well as follow-up initiatives.